Mobile Workshops Announced - Come Experience Santa Fe

WORKSHOPS (details below):
Los Luceros Farm and Historic Chimayo (4 CM, $35)
Historic Architecture Walking Tour (1.5 CM, $10)
Historic Santa Fe Landscapes (1.5 CM, $10)
Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo Tour (3 CM, $35)
Santa Fe’s Plazas: Old and New (1.5 CM, $10)
Co-housing:  Planning in Neighborliness (1.5 CM, $10)
Meow Wolf’s House of Eternal Return and Beyond (1.5 CM, $45)
Santa Fe River Corridor Bike Tour (3 CM, $35)

Los Luceros Farm and Historic Chimayo (4 CM, $35)
Sunday, Sept 8 10am
4pm
Maria Lohmann, Santa Fe County Open Space and Trails Planner
Robert Griego, Santa Fe County Planning Manager
Jim Strozier, FAICP, Consensus Planning

Learn about Northern New Mexico cultural heritage areas including Chimayo and Los Luceros.

Chimayo: This quintessential northern New Mexico town receives more than 300,000 visitors to the scenic El Santuario de Chimayo. Santa Fe County has worked with the community of Chimayo to develop a community plan. Santa Fe County also owns and manages Los Potreros Open Space, which is the scenic backdrop to El Santuario de Chimayo, and was purchased to preserve the traditional agricultural heritage of the area.

Los Luceros Historic Farm:  The cultural site is one of New Mexico’s most scenic and historically significant properties. The New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs purchased the Los Luceros property in 2008 and is working to ensure the site’s preservation and integrity in perpetuity.  The department’s intent is to bring together historic preservation, filmmaking education and training, agricultural and environmental interests.

KGB Distillery: Located adjacent to Los Lucero Historic Farm, the distillery has been in operation for 10 years. We will hear from the owner about challenges associated with creating and running an artisanal distillery in rural New Mexico and shed some light on their upcoming relocation to Albuquerque.

Historic Architecture Walking Tour (1.5 CM, $10)
Sunday, Sept 8th, 1:15 and 3:15 PM Participant Max: 20 (each tour)
David Rasch, architectural historian
David Rasch is an architectural historian who served as the City of Santa Fe Historic Preservation Officer from 2007 to 2018.  He is an expert on Santa Fe Style architecture and the tri-cultural roots that inspired its definition in the early 20th century.  David developed programs to educate the public about our unique built environment while serving as President of the Board of Directors for Friends of Architecture Santa Fe.  In 2018, David received the Honor Award for Architectural Service from the American Institute of Architects, Santa Fe Chapter, in Recognition of Significant Accomplishments in Stimulating Public Understanding and Appreciation of Architecture in the Santa Fe Community.

Description and Education Opportunities:

  1. The tour makes a 1-mile loop around downtown Santa Fe.  

  2. Twenty stops along the way highlight a tapestry of architectural styles and the associated evolving influences through time.  The vocabulary of Pueblo, Spanish, and Anglo architectural details are revealed.

  3. The tour will inspire discussion about the development of Santa Fe style architecture.

Description and Education Opportunities:

  1. The tour makes a 1-mile loop around downtown Santa Fe.  

  2. Twenty stops along the way highlight a tapestry of architectural styles and the associated evolving influences through time.  The vocabulary of Pueblo, Spanish, and Anglo architectural details are revealed.

  3. The tour will inspire discussion about the development of Santa Fe style architecture.

Historic Santa Fe Landscapes (1.5 CM, $10)
Tuesday, Sept 10th 1:45 PM Participant Max: 15

Baker H. Morrow, FASLA , Principal, Morrow Reardon Wilkinson Miller, Ltd

Baker H. Morrow, FASLA, founded the first modern office of landscape architecture in New Mexico in January 1973, and he has been a principal of Morrow Reardon Wilkinson Miller, Ltd., Landscape Architects, for the past 42 years.  His office has earned over 125 design awards and citations since 1980. The Journal Center, the Citywide Prototype Median Landscapes, and the Big I in Albuquerque are among MRWM’s notable projects, as well as Zuhl Library at NMSU and the renovations of Santa Fe Plaza and downtown Eunice and Artesia, New Mexico.

Mr. Morrow is the founder of the Master of Landscape Architecture Program at UNM’s School of Architecture and Planning (2000), where he has taught since 1975 and currently serves as the University’s first Professor of Practice.  He was strongly involved in the establishment of licensure for landscape architects in New Mexico in 1985 and served as vice-chair and chair of the State Board of Landscape Architects. He subsequently worked with ASLA’s national L.A. Law team for several years and was Trustee for the New Mexico Chapter of ASLA.

Mr. Morrow wrote the first-ever Dictionary of Landscape Architecture, published in 1987, a selection of the Garden Book Club.  A third-generation New Mexican, he is also the author of Best Plants for New Mexico Gardens and Landscapes and the co-editor of Canyon Gardens: The Ancient Pueblo Landscapes of the American Southwest.  

A long-time student and chronicler of historic landscapes as Director of the Registry of Historic Landscapes (RHL), Mr. Morrow worked with the governor and the legislature to enact by statute New Mexico’s State Historic Landscape System in 2003.  It is the only state system of its kind to be established in the U.S. in over 120 years.

In 2001, Mr. Morrow became the first native New Mexican to be elected a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects.  He was the recipient of the Stewart Udall Cultural Landscape Preservation Award from the New Mexico Heritage Preservation Alliance in 2008 and the Zia Award of the UNM Alumni Association in 2012 for distinguished professional achievement.

Tour Description/Educational Opportunities: A Glimpse of Downtown Santa Fe’s Historic Landscapes

Santa Fe was founded in the first decade of the 17th century, but the current plaza area had actually been a productive cornfield in even earlier Pueblo times.  Santa Fe Plaza, utilized by at least seven distinct governments, has been one of the most distinguished historic (or cultural) landscapes of the Southwest for over four centuries.  However, located within just a few short blocks of the surrounding downtown area dozens of other historic landscapes may easily be glimpsed during a casual stroll.  The Federal Oval north of the plaza was a racetrack that became a courthouse “square”; Sena Plaza, on East Palace Avenue (famous for its vignette courtyards), is the greatest outdoor space of the Mexican Era in New Mexican landscape architectural history; Archbishop Lamy’s Cathedral Park, with its shady horse chestnut and fir trees, is the remaining fragment of the great cleric and reformer’s legendary 19th century gardens.  And the wonderful Santa Fe River Park, a highlight of Governor Clyde Tingley’s New Deal/CCC-Era recreation and conservation legacy, still delights visitors to the capital only a block or two south of the Fred Harvey La Fonda Hotel.

We’ll do a quick but intensive stroll around these appealing old landscapes and take in some of their charm and character.

Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo Tour (3 CM, $35)
Monday Sept 9th 10:15 AM–3:15 PM Participant Max: 24
Tomasita Duran, Executive Director, Ohkay Owingeh Housing Authority
Shawn Evans, AIA, Principal, Atkin Olshin Schade Architects

Education Opportunities:

This mobile workshop will tour the Pueblo of Ohkay Owingeh plaza, known in the Tewa language as Owe’neh Bupingeh, and present the multiple-award-winning planning project for its revitalization.  Whether you work in Native or non-Native communities, the project offers a model for planning practice and housing/community development in a complex setting. Presenters will describe the combination of community-based planning, including work with youth assessment teams and interviews with elders; appropriate cultural interpretations of preservation in tribal communities; community spaces for traditional practices; revitalization of adobe homes to suit modern lives; energy efficiency; local small business development for housing reconstruction; community-based GIS mapping; and coordination of multiple funding sources.  If you are familiar with the project but have not had a chance to visit and learn from the coordinators, here is your chance. If you are new to New Mexico, this project is not to be missed.


Santa Fe’s Plazas: Old and New (1.5 CM, $10)
Monday, Sept 9th 1:45 PM Participant Max: 15
Ken Hughes
Mayor Alan Webber

Ken Hughes, Mayor Alan Webber (invited, will confirm on March 18). Ken Hughes received a 2002 Certificate in Community Building from the U. of Miami School of Architecture with a case study of New Mexico’s Plazas.  Mayor Webber helped put in place policies that led to the revitalization of downtown Portland OR.

Education Opportunities:

  1. Participants will learn about Santa Fe’s strategies for maintaining the historic Plaza as the heart of the community, despite pressures from the tourist industry.

  2. Participants will learn about the evolution of the new Railyard Plaza and current development and proposals that will help it serve the community.

  3. Participants will learn about strategies, tools, and processes that may be applicable in their own cities or practices.


The tour begins at the Santa Fe Plaza with a brief history. While the shops surrounding the Plaza are now substantially oriented to tourism, the Plaza itself remains the heart of the community. As former Mayor Gonzales said: “Since the creation of the Plaza, public spaces have been about Santa Fe of being inclusive and welcoming, where our ultimate outcome is multi-cultural social integration. Our goal of public space is about bring people from all backgrounds together.”  

We then follow the Santa Fe River to Guadalupe Street, home to small shops and restaurants, continuing one block south to the Railyard. The Railyard is home to our renowned Farmer’s Market, RailRunner commuter train, Railyard Performance Center, Arts District with contemporary galleries, Site Santa Fe, the forthcoming state museum, brewpub, REI, Violet Crown Cinema, new housing – increasingly more of an 18/7 center of activity. If the Plaza is the heart of the community, the Railyard offers the promise of being the City’s lungs – a vital center breathing life into the community as an everyday hub and beehive of commerce and activity, and a gathering place for people from all over the city.

Co-housing:  Planning in Neighborliness (1.5 CM, $10)
Tuesday, Sept 10th 10:15 AM Participant Max: 15
Ken Hughes, resident of Commons on the Alameda since 1993

Education Opportunities:

  1. The Commons on the Alameda, with planning beginning in 1991, is one of the nation’s first cohousing developments. The term cohousing describes housing in a community that incorporates cooperative living into its design and implementation. The major goal of the Commons in Santa Fe is to infuse a sense of community into all aspects of daily living. It also respects the privacy and individual needs of residents. Completed in 1997, the Commons is comprised of 28 residences and a community facility on about five acres located 3 miles west of the Plaza.

  2. Core concepts of Co-housing include participatory decision-making, intentional neighborhood design, extensive common facilities, auto-free interiors, and complete residential management. The overall design of The Commons was greatly influenced by Christopher Alexander’s Pattern Language and partly modeled after the traditional Compound style found in older Santa Fe neighborhoods.


Meow Wolf’s House of Eternal Return and Beyond (1.5 CM, $45)
Monday, Sept 9th 3:15 PM Participant Max: 50
Vince Kadlubek (or designee), CEO, Meow Wolf

Education Opportunities:

  1. The Cerrillos – Rufina area of Santa Fe did not come to mind when thinking of a creative experience in a city well known for its creativity.  Until now. Meow Wolf has exploded on the scene and has literally transformed the area. As a result of the hundreds of thousands of visitors to its House of Eternal Return, sales in nearby businesses are bustling, new workers have been hired, and the neighborhood is experiencing a renaissance.  

  2. Come visit the art collective’s House of Eternal Return, then learn about the third most visited spot in Santa Fe and how its presence gives the industrial and commercial neighbors an arts feel while aiming to protect the current character and use of the area.  You can also find out when a Meow Wolf installation is coming to a city near you; next up are Phoenix, Las Vegas, Denver, and Washington DC.


Santa Fe River Corridor Bike Tour (3 CM, $35)
Tuesday, Sept 8th 1:45–4:30 PM Participant Max: 30
Peter Barile, Descartes Labs, Community & Experiential Marketing Manager
Richard Czoski, Santa Fe Railyard Community Corporation Executive Director
Melissa McDonald, City of Santa Fe River Watershed Coordinator, Licensed Landscape Architect
Scott Kaseman, Santa Fe County Public Works Project Manger
Erick Aune, AICP: Santa Fe Metropolitan Planning Organization Officer; APA-NM Immediate Past President
Rosa Kozub, AICP: New Mexico Dept. of Transportation Planner Supervisor; APA-NM Board Member at Large

Physical Requirements: Ability to ride a bicycle (about 8 miles total; no major hills, but a long, mild incline back to downtown).

Education Opportunities:

Learn about urban trail development and the various features, businesses and projects the trails link in the Santa Fe community, with stops/speakers including:

    1. Descartes Lab Headquarters: a “data-refinery” headquartered in Santa Fe, with locations across the U.S. Descartes uses its data refinery for satellite imagery, for such clients as NASA. It also does impact science work on natural disasters and food security. The HQ building is a beautiful refurbished bank building (100 N. Guadalupe), with all the modern amenities expected of a tech company. Peter Barile will discuss the company’s work, as well as the economic development considerations of their locating in Santa Fe.

    2. Santa Fe Railyard: redevelopment of an old railyard, coordinated with the Trust for Public Land and currently managed by the Santa Fe Railyard Community Corporation. Richard Czoski, Executive Director will discuss Railyard redevelopment.

    3. Santa Fe River Trail: City of Santa Fe River Watershed Coordinator Melissa McDonald to discuss river restoration and trail development. Santa Fe County’s Scott Kaseman will discuss River Trail extension between Frenchy’s Park and Siler Rd, as well as future plans.